Mandy Patinkin - Brother, Can You Spare Sunday in the Park with George 2 days ago   03:06

respectanimals
Mandy Patinkin singing the song "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" as Tony Randall assists with the rehearsal.

Comments 213 Comments

Common Sensible
Would anyone listen to an Al Jolson song without the comedy gag? The comedy was integral to the success of the performance.
jmuduke99
Tony Randall kills me - lol.
jmuduke99
I remember this episode - fantastic.
anon6116
Thank you for this clip, I remember seeing it that night, Mandy is amazing!
N Bussey
Saul Berenson is on the side of the workers.
Davey Houston
saw bing do the song in a 1932 movie mandy was better
Allydog
What you get when an excellent actor with an amazing voice sings a piece like this! THE BEST! Seen him sing many tunes, he 'lives' the songs! YOU ARE BADASS MANDY! LOVE YOU!!
Bert Murphy
Sing it like you mean it brother!
Carl Champion Jr.
Dude that was actually amazing, may have been the best since Al himself.
Stephen Shafer
The audience doesn’t seem to get the meaning of the song.
Jeshex
I saw this when it first aired on TV. Two things...

A) The audience wasn't laughing at the performance or the song.

Tony Randall and Mandy Patinkin came rushing unexpectedly into the theatre because they had to rehearse for a "big show." So these two commandeered the orchestra to practice the song. It was a bit, obviously. The audience isn't laughing at the song--they're laughing at the absurdist element of two idiots coming into a network TV show to practice for another show somewhere else. It was funny (and apparently it was a recurring gag on the show).

2) I majored in theatre in the early 90's and always heard my fellow theatre majors talk about how much they loved Mandy Patinkin. To be honest, his voice never did that much for me and I never saw what the big deal was.

The first time I'd ever seen him perform was his rendition of "Brother, Can You Spare a Dime?" on Dave's show. As soon as he finished the song, I knew immediately what the big deal was.

Thanks for posting this.
King DAIN
It might just be me but this rendition of the song seems completely off. Turning a song known as the anthem of the Great Depression into a comedy sketch seems ridiculous to me. It is actually a tragically sad song, and I think in this performance they completely ignored the lyrics. Mandy Patinkin did a great job singing it, of course, but this didn't feel like a good acknowledgement of the impact of the piece.
jazzgtrplayer
For the people questioning Dave and the audience's reaction -- the whole gimmick here is that Tony Randall would barge into the show unannounced with Mandy Patinkin and tell Dave they needed to use the stage for a quick rehearsal and then Mandy would break into song without getting Dave's permission. It would seem like a joke to the audience, but then Mandy would perform completely in character and give an extremely emotional performance... and then they'd run out of the stage immediately without talking to Dave.
Irv Pinsky
I remember watching this "live." one of my favorite letterman moments.
ahang1001
Sehr schön
assmane999
So freakin' talented that man
golfo0011
Great and dramatic version... with stupid audience!
NickSheridanVids
Wow. The moment when he kills their giggles is brilliant.
Tom Ryan
I remember watching this when it first aired. Very cool. An equally great, lower-key version is by Dominic Chianese on Gilbert Gottfried's podcast: https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=10153371248982205&id=59736317204
Steven Torrey
For those in the slow group--OF WHICH THERE ARE MANY! Tony Randall provides the comedy, he looks like maybe he could be a wall street broker who came out un-scathed by the Great Depression. While Mandy Patinkin looks to be a person actually affected by the Great Depression. So there is an element of comedic shtick in the performance of Randall and Patinkin.
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Sunday in the Park with George Mandy Patinkin - Brother, Can You Spare 2 days ago   08:15

From Stephen Sondheim's 1984 masterpiece. Starring Mandy Patinkin and Bernadette Peters.