Kavli Foundation Special Symposium: Intracellular Liquid Condensates: Cliff 1 day ago   01:19

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Clifford Brangwynne discusses his work to understand and engineer intracellular phase transitions, which play an important role in organizing the contents of living cells. This approach has also begun to yield rich insights into the link between intracellular liquids, gels, and the onset of pathological protein aggregation, and still largely unexplored mechanical interactions between these structures and the genome.

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Intracellular Liquid Condensates: Cliff Kavli Foundation Special Symposium: 1 day ago   40:15

Cliff Brangwynne (Princeton University) presents at the Fred Kavli Special Symposium: From Unit Cell to Biological Cell at the APS March Meeting 2019 in Boston, MA. View abstract below.

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Intracellular Liquid Condensates: New Approaches to Understand and Control Biomolecular Phase Transitions in Living Cells
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In this talk, I will discuss our work to understand and engineer intracellular phase transitions, which play an important role in organizing the contents of living cells. Membrane-less RNA and protein rich condensates are found throughout the cell, and regulate the flow of genetic information. We've shown that liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) underlies the assembly of these structures. LLPS driven by intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDRs) explains many condensate features, for example the internal subcompartments of the nucleolus, which has important consequences for sequential ribosomal RNA processing. Our lab has developed a suite of new approaches, which use light to enable spatiotemporal control of intracellular phase transitions, allowing us to engineer the assembly and disassembly of these structures within defined subregions of the cytoplasm and nucleus. We are now using these tools to quantitatively map intracellular phase diagrams for the first time, providing unprecedented access to the biophysical principles underlying RNP condensate self-assembly. This approach has also begun to yield rich insights into the link between intracellular liquids, gels, and the onset of pathological protein aggregation, and still largely unexplored mechanical interactions between these structures and the genome.