Why Norway is full of Teslas The world is poorly designed. But copying 2 days ago   07:10

Vox
Vox
Oslo is the Tesla capital of the world.

Follow Johnny on Facebook at https://goo.gl/l0x5cA for more photos and videos from his travels around the globe for Vox Borders.
Instagram: https://goo.gl/CduwlO


Subscribe to the Vox Borders newsletter for weekly updates: http://www.vox.com/borders-email



I spent a day in Oslo before traveling to Svalbard, and noticed that there were Teslas everywhere. Upon further investigation, I learned that the Norwegian government heavily incentivizes ownership of electric cars: Tesla doesn't pay a sales tax on the models it sells, electric car owners are exempt from automobile tolls, and they can charge their vehicles for free. The catch is that Norway funds these initiatives through its sovereign wealth fund, which is almost entirely comprised of profits from Norway's oil and fossil fuel exports.

Vox Borders is a new international series focused on telling the human stories that emerge from lines on the map. Johnny will travel to six border locations to produce a final set of documentaries. While he travels he'll release dispatches on YouTube and Facebook documenting his experiences. Learn more: http://www.vox.com/borders-dispatch

Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app.

Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO
Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE
Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o

Comments 10434 Comments

Add Reply

The world is poorly designed. But copying Why Norway is full of Teslas 2 days ago   06:50

Vox
Biomimicry design, explained with 99% Invisible. Check them out here: https://99percentinvisible.org/

Subscribe to our channel here: http://goo.gl/0bsAjO

Japan’s Shinkansen doesn’t look like your typical train. With its long and pointed nose, it can reach top speeds up to 150–200 miles per hour.

It didn’t always look like this. Earlier models were rounder and louder, often suffering from the phenomenon of "tunnel boom," where deafening compressed air would rush out of a tunnel after a train rushed in. But a moment of inspiration from engineer and birdwatcher Eiji Nakatsu led the system to be redesigned based on the aerodynamics of three species of birds.

Nakatsu’s case is a fascinating example of biomimicry, the design movement pioneered by biologist and writer Janine Benyus. She's a co-founder of the Biomimicry Institute, a non-profit encouraging creators to discover how big challenges in design, engineering, and sustainability have often already been solved through 3.8 billion years of evolution on earth. We just have to go out and find them.

This is one of a series of videos we're launching in partnership with 99% Invisible, an awesome podcast about design. 99% Invisible is a member of http://Radiotopia.fm

Additional imagery from the Biodiversity Heritage Library: https://www.flickr.com/photos/biodivlibrary/

Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app.

Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE
Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H
Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o