Four Things You Need To Know Dos and Don'ts of Sharing Photos of Your 1 day ago   03:48

Wall Street Journal
Buying airline tickets can be a maddening ordeal. Luckily, new studies are providing some clues into the inner workings of airline ticket pricing. WSJ's Scott McCartney has the details. Photo: Getty Images.

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Comments 42 Comments

I'mTheToast
I thought it said "The Middle East" in the thumbnail xD
M Vaduz
I have found Sunday is cheaper than Saturday for sure.
The Chicken Stew
I disagree with 0:20 and 3:48

1. Flying nonstop international (and sometimes domestic) is *so* much more that having stops.

2. Book your flight at least 3-6 months in advance, you will get the *best* rates.
Riley Moyer
Did part of Virginia sink on the map?
C L
Non-stops are NOT always cheap. Sometimes, multi-trips are cheaper. So, your number 1 is not always true. It’s still a hit or miss.
Archie Homwe
Number 1 and 2 and 4 generally applies to the US .
Archie Homwe
Number 1 and 2 and 4 generally applies to the US .
kevin dolan
Stop flying! You're destroying our environment.
maestr0ist
3:41 thank me later
D
just go incognito or better yet "ninja mode" (for those who knows) and you will get waaay better flight deals.
works equally well on shopping for anything online really
prilep5
Legal scalping
Rayquazados
The first one is NOT how airlines operate, a legacy airline such as United, American, or Delta will ALWAYS go through one of their hubs in order to connect your flight, that way they will pool a lot of customers to go to a certain destination. The exception to this is if you live in a big city, where the airline possibly has a hub and you're flying to one of their focus cities or other hubs. The reason the airplane is full to begin with is because legacy airlines use this to pool alot of passengers in one flight!! For low cost carriers, who only fly point to point for the most part, it is sort of true. You will pay a lower fee nonstop (they usually don't do connections since connecting flights is also a cost on the airlines side), but depending on who you fly with, you might end up paying a lot of fees for your checked in luggage, food, etc and the cost might be higher or equal to a connecting legacy carrier.



Also, its been consistently shown that fuel fees are about 40% of an airline's operating costs, not a quarter (25%)! That is a HUGE, multi-million difference, and it cuts into an airlines profit. Most of the times, airlines will not change ticket prices because of competition with low cost carriers, who have razor thin costs, but they will need to at some point. More efficient new jets (like the now notorious 737 MAX series or the A320neo) also help when there's price spikes.


Very disappointing and misinforming video from Wall Street Journal!!
Cheng Yiq
Does this tips applies worldwide?
Joe Lau
You don't need a Saturday layover. You can do better buying 2 one way tickets because you can split between 2 airlines. Airlines don't always discount the return route. Plus you get a better selection of departure time and airports.
chronischtelaat
First put some taxes on kerosine, before talking about this!
Abe E
Unless you're Canadian, our airlines have monopolies. Just like our internet and phone companies 👍
I suck at Gaming
Woow how come that one video can be so wrong... Good job..
James Martin
go incognito on your browser then shop & compare
Munden
1.5x speed helps
Neeraj Patidar
I'll try your technique and if it'll work then I'll like the video and subscribe to your channel.
Who else agree???
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Dos and Don'ts of Sharing Photos of Your Four Things You Need To Know 1 day ago   04:10

Unconsenting subjects, child predators and data collection should make any parent pause before posting photos to social media. WSJ's Joanna Stern created an animated children's book to explain. Photo: Dennis Fries for The Wall Street Journal.

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More from the Wall Street Journal:
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Visit the WSJ Video Center: https://wsj.com/video

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